Featured New Books

Here are a few featured  selections from our most recent shipment of new books. These books are located on the new book wall on the second floor and may be checked out at the second floor desk or at the fourth floor circulation desk. If our copy is checked out, use the link to the ALICE catalog and try repeating your search in OhioLINK to find another copy of the book.

Games without rules : the often interrupted history of Afghanistan, by Tamim Ansary

Call Number: DS361 .A755 2012

Today, most Westerners still see the war in Afghanistan as a contest between democracy and Islamist fanaticism. That war is real; but it sits atop an older struggle, between Kabul and the countryside, between order and chaos, between a modernist impulse to join the world and the pull of an older Afghanistan: a tribal universe of village republics permeated by Islam.

 

 

 

 

The invisible hand in popular culture : liberty vs. authority in American film and TV, by Paul A. Cantor

Call Number: PN1995.9.P6 C285 2012

Popular culture often champions freedom as the fundamentally American way of life and celebrates the virtues of independence and self-reliance. But film and television have also explored the tension between freedom and other core values, such as order and political stability. What may look like healthy, productive, and creative freedom from one point of view may look like chaos, anarchy, and a source of destructive conflict from another. Film and television continually pose the question: Can Americans deal with their problems on their own, or must they rely on political elites to manage their lives?

 

The last shepherd, by Martin Etchart

Call Number: PS3605.T38 L37 2012

Mathieu Etchiberri wants nothing more than to leave his family’s Arizona sheep ranch and go to college, but his father insists that he take over the ranch instead. Then his father is killed in an accident, and Matt discovers that he is not the heir to the ranch. So he travels to the French Pyrenees from which his father and grandparents came to settle the questions about his legacy. Instead, he discovers a vast Basque family and a mystery that drove his father to America and still festers in the mountain village. As Matt resolves the mystery of his family, he also discovers his Basque roots and learns the nature of love of family, responsibility, and the tension between individual desires and the needs of a community.

 

Venus in the afternoon : stories, by Tehila Lieberman

Call Number: PS3612.I33523 V46 2012

The short stories in this rich debut collection embody in their complexity Alice Munro’s description of the short story as “a world seen in a quick, glancing light.” In chiseled and elegant prose, Lieberman conjures wildly disparate worlds. A middle aged window washer, mourning his wife and an estranged daughter, begins to grow attached to a young woman he sees through the glass; a writer, against his better judgment, pursues a new relationship with a femme fatale who years ago broke his heart; and the daughter of a Holocaust survivor struggles with the delicate decision of whether to finally ask her aging mother how it was that she survived. It is all here—the exigencies of love, of lust, the raw, unlit terrain of grief. Whether plumbing the darker depths or casting a humorous eye on a doomed relationship, these stories never force a choice between tragedy and redemption, but rather invite us into the private moments and crucibles of lives as hungry and flawed as our own.

 

1775 : a good year for revolution, by Kevin Phillips

Call Number: E231 .P55 2012

An unconventional assessment of the American Revolution examines the events, politics, economic factors, and military preparations of 1775 that ignited the war and established patriot control over American governance and key territories.