OHIO University Libraries http://www.library.ohiou.edu Wed, 01 Jul 2015 19:48:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Notable News from the Libraries’ Staff http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/notable-news-from-the-libraries-staff-3/ http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/notable-news-from-the-libraries-staff-3/#comments Fri, 26 Jun 2015 16:14:13 +0000 http://www.library.ohiou.edu/?p=31366
(From left to right) Chad Boeninger, Sherri Saines, Miriam Nelson, Gary Ginther, Katy Mathuews, Janet Carleton, Hilary Bussell, Jeff Ferrier, Yan He, Andrew Stuart, Carrie Preston, Chris Guder, Debi Orr, Jessica Hagman, Megan Tomeo, Lisa Mackinder, Janet Hulm, Sara Harrington, Deborah Daniels, Jeff Shane and Miriam Intrator. (Photos courtesy of Ohio University Libraries)

(From left to right) Chad Boeninger, Sherri Saines, Miriam Nelson, Gary Ginther, Katy Mathuews, Janet Carleton, Hilary Bussell, Jeff Ferrier, Yan He, Andrew Stuart, Carrie Preston, Chris Guder, Debi Orr, Jessica Hagman, Megan Tomeo, Lisa Mackinder, Janet Hulm, Sara Harrington, Deborah Daniels, Jeff Shane and Miriam Intrator. (Photos courtesy of Ohio University Libraries)

The Libraries’ staff is a critical piece to the larger puzzle that represents the operations, development and growth of Ohio University Libraries. Each year, staff members work independently, and sometimes collaboratively, to contribute their rich knowledge and skill set to the field of librarianship and the functionality of OHIO Libraries.

Read on to learn about the latest work and accomplishments of OHIO Libraries’ staff:

Janet Carleton, digital initiatives coordinator, was awarded with the 2015 Society of Ohio Archivists Merit Award, for excellence in the support of archives in Ohio over the past year, during the organization’s annual meeting on May 15, 2015. Additionally, Carleton led a session titled, “Getting off to a Good Start with Digitization” where she presented on writing fundable grant proposals during the Ohio Local History Alliance and the Society of Ohio Archivists’ joint meeting held in Worthington, Ohio in October 2014.

Jeff Ferrier, curator of international collections, served as moderator for the panel titled “Cultural Crossroads: Global, National, Regional and Local Contexts,” at the Sixth annual Khmer Studies Forum hosted at Ohio University in March 2014.

Gary Ginther, fine arts librarian, presented a poster, titled “Incorporating the Scholar’s Voice in Discovery: Metadata Integration with Google Forms” at the 13th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities in Honolulu, Hawaii, in January 2015.

Dr. Chris Guder, reference and instruction librarian, published an article, titled “Universal Design and the Library Website,” that appeared in Public Services Quarterly in 2014. He also wrote a book review, titled “Runs, hits & errors: Kammie on First,” that appeared in the Spring 2015 edition of the Ohio Today magazine, a publication for alumni and friends of the University.

Jessica Hagman, social media coordinator and subject librarian for Scripps College, defended her thesis and earned a Master of Arts in Organizational Communication from Ohio University in Spring 2015.

Dr. Sara Harrington, head of arts and archives, earned a Master of Education in Higher Education from Ohio University in May 2014. In addition, she presented “The Voinovich Collections” at the George V. Voinovich and Public Private Partnerships Conference held at Cleveland State University in August 2014.

Dr. Yan He, curator of the Dr. Shao You-Bao Overseas Chinese Documentation and Research Center, contributed articles to several publications: “Making Sense of the War (China),” in the International Encyclopedia of the First World War (2014); “Rethinking the May Fourth Movement in a Global Perspective,” in Wenhui Daily (2014), pg. 12; “An Interview with Dr. Hwa-wei Lee: Dr. Lee and the Shao Overseas Chinese Center in Twenty Years,” in The International Journal of Diasporic Chinese Studies (2014), Vol. 6(2), pg. 71-76; “American Psychological Warfare towards China in the Early Cold War Period – Voice of America, Gray Radio and Chinese Reporting Program,” in the Journal of Society for Chinese Studies Librarians (2015), Vol. 5 (1), pg. 213-230. Additionally, she gave a talk, titled “ The Shao Overseas Chinese Documentation and Research Center at Ohio University – Collection, Cooperation and its Future,” at Beihua University in Jilin, China in December 2014. She also presented “The Southeast Asia Collection at Ohio University Libraries – with a Focus on Diplomatic Archives and Documentation” at a conference on the relations between China and its neighboring countries during the Cold War, which was hosted by East China Normal University’s Center for Cold War International History Studies and History and Public Policy at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Shanghai, China in December 2014. The presentation was made in both Chinese and English and became a publication in the conference proceedings.

Dr. Miriam Intrator, special collections librarian, was awarded the 2015 Phyllis Dain Library History Dissertation Award from the Library History Round Table of the American Library Association (ALA) for her dissertation titled, “Books Across Borders and Between Libraries: UNESCO and the Politics of Postwar Cultural Reconstruction, 1945-1951.” Intrator also received a 2015 Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Mid-career Librarian scholarship to attend the ACRL National Conference. In addition, Intrator served as a presenter for “Wrangling Bits and Herding Cats: Donor Relations in the Digital Era,” a session at the Midwest Archives Conference 2015 Annual Meeting.

Lisa Mackinder, head of acquisitions & collections services, published an article, titled “The Seemingly Endless Challenge: Workflows,” in The Serials Librarian: From the Printed Page to the Digital Age in 2014. In addition, she presented “Time Will Tell: DDA Data and the Story of Money Saved and Time Rearranged” at The Great Lakes e-Summit held in Oregon, Ohio in September 2014. Mackinder is also an instructor for the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) online course, Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Acquisitions.

Katy Mathuews, collections assessment & stacks management librarian, presented “Using Library and Institutional Data to Initiate Collaborative Outreach” at the Academic Library Association of Ohio (ALAO) Assessment Interest Group Spring Workshop held in Columbus, Ohio in April 2015.  She was also a panel member for “Seamless Discovery: Bridging the Research Pathway from K12 to College and Career” at the Ohio Educational Technology Conference hosted in Columbus, Ohio in February 2015. Additionally, Katy presented a poster session, titled “Library Partnerships: Collaborating to Increase First-Year Student Success” at the 34th Annual Conference on the First-Year Experience held in Dallas, Texas in February 2015.

Miriam Nelson, head of preservation, has been appointed chair of the American Library Association/Association for Library Collections & Technical Services Preservation Week Committee; and elected secretary of the Ohio Preservation Council and will serve on the 2013-2015 executive board. Additionally, she and Robin Krivesti, facilities & stacks manager, were invited to speak at the Connecting to Collections workshop, titled “Sustainable Preservation Practices: A Partnership of Facilities and Collections Care Staff” held at the State Library of Ohio in November 2014; and “Simple Enclosures for Cultural Heritage Collections” during the Ohio Local History Alliance and Society of Ohio Archivists joint meeting held in Worthington, Ohio in October 2014.

Debi Orr, learning resource center/health sciences librarian, was selected as 2014-2015 president-elect of the Ohio Health Sciences Library Association, an organization established in 1994 to promote the exchange of knowledge between health information professionals.

Carrie Preston, head of web services, served as Chairperson of the Ohio Valley Group of Technical Services Librarians, an organization encompassing Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky. With help from other Libraries staff, she organized the Ohio Valley Group of Technical Services Librarians 2014 Conference. She also coordinated the System Managers Forum at the Innovative Users Group 2015 Conference. Additionally, she is within a few weeks of completing a professional certificate in Back-End Web Development.

Sherri Saines, instructional librarian, presented “The Ultimate LibGuide: The Embedded Librarian in the Linguistics Classroom” during the sixth annual Ohio University CALL Conference in April 2014.

Jeff Shane, Southeast Asia reference librarian, presented a paper, titled “The Russian Revolution in the Eyes of a Thai Royal,” at the annual Council on Thai Studies (COTS) Conference at the University of Wisconsin in October 2014.

Andrew Stuart, assistant head of reference, has been elected vice-chair/chair elect of Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Science and Technology section. Stuart currently serves as secretary, however when his term ends in June, he will take on his new three-year term: one year as vice-chair, one year as chair and one year as past chair. As vice-chair Stuart will primarily be responsible for committee appointments of the section; as chair he will lead the section and as the past chair he will chair the section nominating committee that recruits new leadership for the section.

Megan Tomeo, web services librarian, presented a session, titled “Getting Started with Google Tag Manager for Simple Event Tracking,” at the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) 2015 Conference held in Portland, Oregon in March 2015.

Collaborations between OHIO Librarians:

Hilary Bussell, eLearning librarian; Jessica Hagman, social media coordinator; and Chris Guder, reference and instruction librarian, presented a paper, titled “Mixin’ it Up: Using a Mixed Methods Approach to Understand Graduate Research Needs,” at the 2015 ACRL National Conference in March.

Chad Boeninger, head of reference; Deborah Daniels, business unit manager & analyst; Jeff Ferrier, curator of international collections; Sara Harrington, head of arts and archives; and Janet Hulm, assistant dean for collections and digital initiatives, collaborated to present “Expressing Value in a Changing Budget Climate” at the Library Assessment Conference in August 2014.

Sherri Saines, instructional librarian collaborated with Hilary Bussell, e-Learning librarian, to present “Radical Pedagogy and the World of Too Much Information” during a workshop at the Women’s and Gender Studies Graduate Conference held at Ohio University in February 2014.

Please join OHIO Libraries in congratulating these staff members for their outstanding work in the field of librarianship!

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Libraries to Relocate Fourth Floor Serials Collection http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/libraries-to-relocate-fourth-floor-serials-collection/ http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/libraries-to-relocate-fourth-floor-serials-collection/#comments Thu, 25 Jun 2015 14:53:05 +0000 http://www.library.ohiou.edu/?p=31324

You may have picked up on the apparent changes that have been reshaping the landscape of Alden Library over the past few months. One of the most noteworthy changes is currently taking place with the relocation the of Libraries’ fourth floor serials collection.

The serials collection includes publications such as magazines, periodicals, newspapers and academic journals. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

The serials collection includes publications such as magazines, periodicals, newspapers and academic journals. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

The Libraries’ fourth floor serials collection—composed of magazines, periodicals, newspapers, academic journals, and other sequentially published materials—is being relocated from the east side of the fourth floor, near the children’s book collection, to the sixth and seventh floors of Alden, where they will be shelved according to their call numbers. It is anticipated this move will be complete before the beginning of Fall semester.

According to Janet Hulm, assistant dean for collections & digital initiatives, the relocation was prompted by the evaluation of the LibQUAL+® survey, a nationally distributed, web-based evaluation that allows libraries to request, track and assess user opinions about the quality of their services. Results of the LibQUAL+® survey indicated that students would like to have access to more library space.

“Students should know that the Library’s first and foremost concern is the academic needs of our students and faculty,” said Hulm.  “We are interested in continuing our tradition of responding to the needs of our community, thus we are creating more study space without impeding access to research materials.”

The relocation of the serials collection will allow students to use the vacant space on the fourth floor for activities such as quiet studying and group collaborations.

The publications in the Libraries’ serials collection are currently being relocated to the sixth and seventh floors of Alden Library. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

The publications in the Libraries’ serials collection are currently being relocated to the sixth and seventh floors of Alden Library. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

“By moving most of the current periodicals, we can meet some of this demand on a floor that is very amenable to very nice study space,” said Hulm. “The east side of the fourth floor is open, which makes it easy for us to create flexible study space.  The several large windows make the area naturally aesthetically pleasing.”

Prior to the relocation, the most recent publications from the serials collection were being shelved on the fourth floor and the older publications were being kept on the seventh floor. One of the benefits to relocating all of the serials to Alden’s sixth and seventh floors is that the new location will provide ease of access for library users.

This will put the majority of periodicals all in one place, and should make finding print periodicals in the building simpler since they will not be in two different locations,” said Hulm. “We will be keeping about 100 current periodical titles on the fourth floor.  These 100 represent titles that lend themselves to casual browsing.”

Although there has been a growth in the use and demand for electronic materials, Hulm recognizes that the Libraries’ users still value printed materials such as the publications that can be found in the Libraries’ serials collection.

“Most users prefer electronic journal literature over print because of the ease of access, but there is still a need for print for some subject areas. We will continue to have access to that print and it will be discoverable through library databases.”

Please stay tuned to learn about more about future changes coming to Alden Library!

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Institute of Chinese Academic Leaders held at Athens Campus http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/libraries-valuing-tradition-while-managing-change/ http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/libraries-valuing-tradition-while-managing-change/#comments Thu, 25 Jun 2015 11:44:08 +0000 http://www.library.ohiou.edu/?p=31369

Inside_Chinese_Institute_psd

What’s happening next in academic libraries—is happening at Ohio University. From July 26 through August 7, 2015, Ohio University Libraries is hosting the first Institute for Chinese Academic Leaders: Valuing the Best of Tradition While Strategically Managing Change.

The invited participants, Chinese leaders from a select group of academic deans and assistant deans, will investigate strategic approaches to address new challenges, yet still hold true to the long-standing values of the profession.

The two-week long Institute for Chinese Academic Leaders, held on Ohio University’s Athens Campus, will feature top U.S. and international experts covering today’s issues and challenges facing academic libraries such as: buildings and design, special collections, Chinese-American relations, innovative services, and strategic planning for the next generation of academic libraries.

“Our Chinese colleagues participating in this program will interact in a small group setting with American library leaders representing a significant breadth and depth of experiences in academic libraries,” said Kelly Broughton, assistant dean for research and education at Ohio University Libraries. “They will discuss the commonalities and differences between our cultures in delivering state of the art library services and spaces… of the future.”

Additionally, the Chinese institute will include visits to several major American universities: Carnegie Mellon University, Georgetown University, George Washington University, University of Cincinnati, and Ohio State University; as well as key American institutions that have had a significant impact on libraries, which include: Library of Congress, National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), and Southeast Ohio Regional Depository.

Ohio University’s long established history with China began as early as 1909, when the first Chinese student enrolled in the University. In the summer of 1978, almost 70 years later, Ohio University welcomed the Chinese Education Delegation looking to initiate a program for educational exchange with American institutions of higher education—and Ohio University was selected for its ideal environment and academic curriculum for Chinese studying abroad.

Following the establishment of the exchange program, OHIO Libraries founded the International Librarians Internship Program to train librarians from developing countries in Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

According to the publication, “Sage in the Cathedral of Books,” by Yang Yang, “The internship program at Ohio University played a critical role in the development of Chinese librarianship in the 1980s and 1990s.”  Many of those same Chinese interns later became leaders in the field of professional librarianship.

“It was then Dean of Libraries Hwa-Wei Lee’s vision to create as many cultural exchanges with Chinese librarians as possible. Nearly a quarter of a century later, it’s evident how important an impact that exchange has had on our profession,” said Scott Seaman, dean of Libraries, “It’s an extraordinary legacy that we are honored to continue.”

Today, the stream of Chinese students to the Ohio University campus has continued—in fall 2014, over 800 undergraduate and graduate students from China enrolled at the University.

The upcoming Institute for Chinese Academic Leaders held in Athens, Ohio is another instance of over 100 years of continuing cooperation and mutual understanding between Ohio University and its international Chinese colleagues.

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Photo by OHIO Alumnus Thomas Schiff (1970)

Graphic design by Tyler Stabile

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Swipe and Go: The Libraries’ New Printing System http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/swipe-and-go-the-libraries-new-printing-system/ http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/swipe-and-go-the-libraries-new-printing-system/#comments Mon, 22 Jun 2015 15:17:51 +0000 http://www.library.ohiou.edu/?p=31340

Have you ever needed to print materials in a hurry on your way to class? Due to the upcoming changes to the OHIO Libraries’ printing system, you can do this from the convenience of your mobile device or from one of the Libraries’ computers.

Ohio University Libraries and the Office of Information Technology (OIT) have partnered to establish a plan that will streamline the Libraries’ current printing system through the implementation of several new procedures, which will begin on June 28, 2015.

“The new printing system is intended to unify student printing with the same convenient options across campus,” said Carrie Preston, head of web services. “Since so many students print in the Libraries, it’s important for the Libraries to be part of this. In addition, the new printing system will introduce significant benefits for users.”

The updates to the Libraries’ printing system include changes for two groups of Libraries users—the first group includes students and the second group is made up of the faculty, staff, visiting scholars and community members who use the Libraries’ printers.

Each printer will be equipped with an easy-to-use card reader, that will allow you to swipe your OHIO ID or Guest Printing Card to release print jobs sent from any computer. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

Each printer will be equipped with an easy-to-use card reader, that will allow you to swipe your OHIO ID or Guest Printing Card to release print jobs sent from any computer. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

The changes for all Libraries users include:

  • Libraries users will now be able to print from any Alden Library computer to any of its printers, which means if there is an issue with one printer the user can use another without resending the print job.
  • Print jobs will only be released when individuals swipe their OHIO IDs or Guest Printing Cards at the printers, which will all be equipped with card readers. The user’s card must be swiped within an hour of sending the material before losing access to the print job.

According to Sean O’Malley, IT communications manager, the new printing system will benefit students in several ways.

“The new plan was implemented to improve the student printing experience,” said O’Malley.

The changes for students include:

  • Students will now be able to print directly from their computers, tablets or phones without having to install software.
  • There will no longer be registration holds for unpaid printing fees.
  • Bobcat Cash, a prepaid debit card-like currency that can be applied to a student account and used to make purchases at various campus retailers, will be used to cover printing costs. An added bonus to the new printing policy is that Bobcat Cash can now be added to an account online, and it will instantly become available for use.
After sending, you have up to an hour to pick up your print job from one of the Libraries’ printers. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

After sending, you have up to an hour to pick up your print job from one of the Libraries’ printers. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

The changes for faculty, staff, visiting scholars and community members include:

  • New Guest Printing Cards will replace the University Libraries Copy/Vended Printing Cards. (Those who already have a Copy/Vended Printing Card will be able to trade it in at no cost).
  • Users will be able to use any printer in the Libraries instead of only having access to a few “vended” printers.

These changes will not come without multiple levels of communication, as the Libraries and OIT have planned several strategies to inform the OHIO community about the new printing system.

“The Libraries web site will include instructions for how to print under the new system, and the Libraries hope to provide signs and handouts near the printers and other service points,” said Preston.

OIT will be sending an email notification to individuals who have recently used the Libraries’ printing system. In addition, the office will distribute press releases and other informative literature. Finally, students who have attended the summer Bobcat Student Orientation are being made aware of the new printing system.

All of these changes to the current printing system will be implemented throughout many University departments and are expected to begin later this summer and during the early part of fall semester.

“The Libraries, College of Business and the Dublin campus of the Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine (HCOM) will start using the new system on June 28,” said O’Malley. “Athens and Cleveland HCOM locations will follow before the start of the HCOM academic calendar, with other University areas coming online throughout summer and fall.”

For information on current and upcoming Libraries printing options, visit: http://www.library.ohiou.edu/printing.

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Featured New Books http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/featured-new-books-53/ http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/featured-new-books-53/#comments Thu, 11 Jun 2015 15:32:37 +0000 http://www.library.ohiou.edu/?p=31110

Here are a few featured  selections from our most recent shipment of new books. These books are located on the new book wall on the second floor and may be checked out at the second floor desk or at the fourth floor circulation desk. If our copy is checked out, use the link to the ALICE catalog and try repeating your search in OhioLINK to find another copy of the book.

The earth, from myths to knowledge, by Hubert Krivine ; translated by David Fernbach

Call Number: QE11 .K7513 2015

Our planet’s elliptical orbit around the Sun and its billions-of-years existence are facts we take for granted, matters every literate high school student is expected to grasp. But humanity’s struggle towards these scientific truths lasted millennia. Few of us have more than the faintest notion of the path we have travelled.

 

 

 

 

 

Black hole : how an idea abandoned by Newtonians, hated by Einstein, and gambled on by Hawking became loved, by Marcia Bartusiak

Call Number: QB843.B55 B37 2015

For more than half a century, physicists and astronomers engaged in heated dispute over the possibility of black holes in the universe. The weirdly alien notion of a space-time abyss from which nothing escapes—not even light—seemed to confound all logic. This engrossing book tells the story of the fierce black hole debates and the contributions of Einstein and Hawking and other leading thinkers who completely altered our view of the universe.

 

 

 

 

The interstellar age : inside the forty-year Voyager mission, by Jim Bell

Call Number: QB601 .B45 2015

An award-winning Cornell astronomer traces the story of the men and women behind the Voyager spacecraft mission to share insight into their motivations, describe the human artifacts the first spacecraft contains and discuss the mission’s potential. By the author of Postcards From Mars.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OHIO Libraries: On the Green Weekend [Photo Essay] http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/ohio-libraries-on-the-green-weekend-photo-essay/ http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/ohio-libraries-on-the-green-weekend-photo-essay/#comments Thu, 04 Jun 2015 16:37:53 +0000 http://www.library.ohiou.edu/?p=31009

The Ohio University Alumni Association hosted On the Green Weekend, known as the University’s spring Homecoming, from Wednesday, May 27 through Sunday, May 31, 2015.

The five-day event, attended by alumni, their families and the OHIO community, featured activities that catered to interests in academics, the arts and special reunions. The Libraries organized two of the events held over the weekend.

On Friday, May 29, Janet Carleton, digital initiatives coordinator, led an informational session titled “Tour OHIO History Online,” where she shared how individuals can access OHIO’s history online. Yearbooks, campus maps, photographs, alumni journals, vintage summer course catalogs and limited issues of the Athens Post can be found online through the Ohio University Libraries’ University Archives website.

On Saturday, May 30, Doug McCabe, curator of manuscripts, hosted a horse drawn, hayride around The Ridges, formerly known as the Athens Lunatic Asylum. Speaking to over 70 participants, McCabe shared a brief history of the original complex and encouraged attendees to visit the Mahn Center for Archives and Special Collections to view items such as photographs, maps and correspondence from the asylum.

Other weekend highlights included the leadership meetings and programming; filmfests celebrating 1965, 1975 and 1985; a 5K run; golf games and the “OH, I do” marriage vow renewal ceremony.

Please check out the Libraries’ Flickr page to view more photographs from On the Green Weekend.

 

(From left) Constance J. Blinn and Dr. Roy A. Blinn listen to the presentation “Tour OHIO History Online” on Friday, May 29, 2015. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

(From left) Constance J. Blinn and Dr. Roy A. Blinn listen to the presentation “Tour OHIO History Online” on Friday, May 29, 2015. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

 

A horse drawn hay wagon stops outside of the Kennedy Museum at The Ridges before Doug McCabe, curator of manuscripts, leads a tour of the complex on Saturday, May 30, 2015. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries).

A horse drawn hay wagon stops outside of the Kennedy Museum at The Ridges before Doug McCabe, curator of manuscripts, leads a tour of the complex on Saturday, May 30, 2015. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries).

 

Doug McCabe, curator of manuscripts for Ohio University Libraries, talks about points of interest during a hay ride tour of The Ridges on Saturday, May 30, 2015. (Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

Doug McCabe, curator of manuscripts for the OHIO Libraries’ Mahn Center, gives a brief history of the Athens Lunatic Asylum while leading a tour of The Ridges. Photographs, maps and correspondence from the Athens Lunatic Asylum can be viewed at the Mahn Center. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

 

A view of Cemetery 1 during a tour of the grounds led by Doug McCabe, curator of manuscripts for Ohio University Libraries, on Saturday, May 30, 2015. (Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

A view of Cemetery 1 during a tour of the grounds led by Doug McCabe, curator of manuscripts for the OHIO Libraries’ Mahn Center. Talking points included the 1868 construction of the asylum; the architecture influenced by the Kirkbride Plan, a system of asylum designs that emerged in the 19th century under the influence of psychiatrist Thomas Story Kirkbride; the opening of the asylum in 1874 and the University’s acquisition of the property in 1988. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

 

(From left) Doug McCabe, curator of manuscripts for Ohio University Libraries, points at architectural points of interest while leading a tour of the The Ridges as Joe Zook and Andrew Zook drive the horse drawn wagon on Saturday, May 30, 2015. (Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

(From left) Doug McCabe, curator of manuscripts, discusses points of interest regarding The Ridges, formerly known as the Athens Lunatic Asylum, while Joe and Andrew Zook drive the horse drawn wagon. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

Janet Carleton, digital initiatives coordinator for Ohio University Libraries, discusses how to access Ohio University Libraries’ Archives online during her presentation, “Tour OHIO History Online,” on the second floor of the Baker Center on Friday, May 29, 2015. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

Janet Carleton, digital initiatives coordinator for Ohio University Libraries, discusses how to access Ohio University Libraries’ Archives online during her presentation, “Tour OHIO History Online,” on the second floor of the Baker Center on Friday, May 29, 2015. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

(From left) Charles and Jean Wannamaker, who recently moved to Athens to be closer to their family, take in the sights of of a hay ride tour at The Ridges along with their granddaughters Ava and Summer Forster on Saturday, May 30, 2015. (Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

(From left) Charles and Jean Wannamaker, who recently moved to Athens to be closer to their family, take in the sights of the historical tour at The Ridges along with their granddaughters Ava and Summer Forster. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

 

(From left) Doug McCabe, curator of manuscripts for Ohio University Libraries, talks about points of interest while leading a tour of the The Ridges as passengers Bradley Evans, a graduate of 1985, and Tess Evans, a graduate of 1984, survey the grounds on Saturday, May 30, 2015. (Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

(From left) Doug McCabe, curator of manuscripts, leading a tour of The Ridges as alumni Bradley Evans (’85) and Tess Evans (’84), survey the grounds on Saturday, May 30, 2015. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

 All Photos by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries

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Alden Library Hosts Exhibit on Charles Dickens http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/alden-library-hosts-exhibit-on-charles-dickens/ http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/06/alden-library-hosts-exhibit-on-charles-dickens/#comments Wed, 03 Jun 2015 16:44:55 +0000 http://www.library.ohiou.edu/?p=30899
An original 1804 serial edition of “Master Humphrey’s Clock” by Charles Dickens. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

An original 1840 serial edition of “Master Humphrey’s Clock” by Charles Dickens. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

The whole difference between construction and creation is exactly this: that a thing constructed can only be loved after it is constructed; but a thing created is loved before it exists Charles Dickens

Ohio University Libraries will celebrate the legacy of 19th century English writer Charles Dickens in an exhibit titled, “Charles Dickens—A Sensation: From London to Ohio,” which will be on display from June 1 through August 28, 2015 on the fifth floor of Alden Library.

Charles Dickens is regarded as one of the most prolific writers of his time and is known for writing classic novels such as “Oliver Twist” , “A Christmas Carol” and “A Tale of Two Cities.”

Kevin Dennis, a graduate student in adolescent to young adult education, began examining the Mahn Center for Archives and Special Collections’ Charles Dickens Author Collection as a student enrolled in ENG 4940 Research Apprenticeship with associate professor Joe McLaughlin and special collections librarian Miriam Intrator. Since April, Dennis has been working under Intrator’s guidance to curate the exhibit.

Items from the “Charles Dickens Rare Print Collection” on display as a part of the exhibit, “Charles Dickens—A Sensation: From London to Ohio.” (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

Items from the “Charles Dickens Rare Print Collection” on display as a part of the exhibit, “Charles Dickens—A Sensation: From London to Ohio.” (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

According to Intrator, one of the overarching goals of the exhibit is to “show Charles Dickens as a celebrity in the 19th century and his legacy ever-after.” Dennis echoes this sentiment as a goal for the exhibit, which will spotlight Dickens’ travels and influence in the state of Ohio.

“Specifically, I want to show that Dickens’ fame spread from London to Ohio and the rest of America,” said Dennis. “He was the first modern celebrity, and it is important to understand the level and scope of influence that he had on the world. Also, I want to provide an easy access point for Ohioans when it comes to learning about Dickens, and the Ohio-related pieces in this exhibit were selected with that in mind.”

This objective will be met by including items such as books, playbills, collections of Dickens’ works, public readings, documentation of his travels and legacy in Ohio. The display will also feature a sheet of commemorative Charles Dickens postage stamps and a pop-up version of one of Dickens’ most well known works, A Christmas Carol, a 19th century holiday classic.

The 2010 edition of “A Christmas Carol: A Pop-up Book.” (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

The 2010 edition of “A Christmas Carol: A Pop-up Book.” (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

“The most notable items in my opinion are the books and materials about Ohio,” said Dennis. ‘American Notes’ details Dickens’ trip through the states and includes an account of his time in Ohio. There are also a number of pamphlets and materials related to the Marion, Ohio branch of the Dickens Fellowship including a program for the inaugural meeting and the hand-written journal of its founder, Dr. Edward Ellsworth Hipsher.”

One of the most unique aspects of the exhibit is the inclusion of an original serial installment of Dickens’ 1840-1841 novel, “Master Humphrey’s Clock.”

“…We want to ensure that students, faculty, staff, and visitors know how rich our collections are and that we hold some quite rare and wonderfully interesting materials,” said Intrator. “Certainly the original serial installments are a great example.”

Intrator recalls that during the months he spent researching, Dennis came across manuscript material on the Dickens Fellowship in Marion, Ohio. The existence of these documents reiterates the scope of Dickens’ influence locally.

Please stop by the fifth floor of Alden Library to check out the exhibit, which will be on display through August 28.

 

 

All photos by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries

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Libraries announces endowment awards http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/05/libraries-announces-endowment-awards/ http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/05/libraries-announces-endowment-awards/#comments Fri, 29 May 2015 17:49:20 +0000 http://www.library.ohiou.edu/?p=30862

A motto for OHIO faculty could be: Research marks the beginning of discovery.

Dr. William Owens, associate professor and chair of Classics and World Religions, holding a volume of “Epictetus Discourses,” translated by W.A. Oldfather, and “Apuleius: Metamorphoses,” a Latin novel translated by J. Arthur Hanson from the Loeb Classical Library. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

Dr. William Owens, associate professor and chair of Classics and World Religions, holding a volume of “Epictetus Discourses,” translated by W.A. Oldfather, and “Apuleius: Metamorphoses,” a Latin novel translated by J. Arthur Hanson from the Loeb Classical Library. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

As faculty members reach new levels of achievement, they have an increased need for materials to support their research.

The Libraries has circumvented obstacles associated with acquiring special research materials by providing faculty with the opportunity to apply for the 1804 Special Library Endowment Fund and the Arts and Humanities Junior Faculty Endowment Fund, two endowments created to support research and teaching.

The funds allow the Libraries to purchase specialized books, databases and other rare resources that ordinarily would not be acquirable through regular funding.

Dr. William Owens, associate professor and chair of Classics and World Religions, received one of the 1804 Special Library Endowments for the Libraries’ purchase of the digitized Loeb Classical Library, a collection composed of over 500 printed volumes of the most important texts in Greek and Roman literature. The collection includes the original written works in Greek and Latin, as well as English translations.

Owens is currently researching how Greek and Roman slaves were represented in ancient literature, in particular, the Greek novel.

Dr. Jeremy Webster, associate professor of British literature and dean of the Honors Tutorial College, is researching how manuscript poems from the Restoration period made arguments about the court, the king, parliament, morality and politics. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

Dr. Jeremy Webster, associate professor of British literature and dean of the Honors Tutorial College, is researching how manuscript poems from the Restoration period made arguments about the court, the king, parliament, morality and politics. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

“…These texts are foundational to so many academic disciplines, it opens up this library to faculty and students wherever they are,” said Owens.

Tim Smith, subject librarian for the Classics and World Religions department, among others, worked with Owens in writing the proposal for the 1804 Special Library Fund.

“Greek and Roman literature enriches the lives of everyone who studies it and is willing to learn from those writers,” said Smith. “It gives them a better perspective on where we are today—and where we may be going in the future. The past didn’t go anywhere; it’s still with us.”

Dr. Jeremy Webster, associate professor of British literature and dean of the Honors Tutorial College, was also awarded with an 1804 Special Library Fund for the Libraries’ purchase of the English Clandestine Satire, 1660-1704: Popular Culture, Entertainment and Information in the Early Modern Period.

The 24-reel collection of microfilm contains 22,000 pages of political verse and satire manuscripts from 18 national and international locations including Harvard, the National Library of Ireland and the Kugelike Biblioteket in Sweden.

“I’m particularly interested in these manuscript poems and collections of poems and how they make arguments about the court, the king, parliament, morality and lots of political changes happening in the [Restoration] period,” said Webster.

Dr. Charles Buchanan, director of Interdisciplinary Arts, researches Italian manuscripts from the 11th century, which inspires the OHIO courses he teaches on early medieval manuscript illumination. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

Dr. Charles Buchanan, director of Interdisciplinary Arts, researches Italian manuscripts from the 11th century, which inspires the OHIO courses he teaches on early medieval manuscript illumination. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

When putting together his proposal for the English Clandestine Satire, Webster recalls how he appreciated the easy, straight-to-the-point format of the application process and how helpful the Libraries’ staff was in assisting him with any questions he may have had.

“I think it’s a great way to augment our collections here [at Ohio University Libraries] and simultaneously help us [faculty] do our research,” said Webster.

Dr. Charles Buchanan, director of Interdisciplinary Arts, was the third recipient of the 1804 Special Library Fund for the Libraries’ purchase of the Lorsch Gospels and Codex Benedictus. The Lorsch Gospels is an example of a Carolingian manuscript (9th century) that inspired the Italian manuscripts from the 11th century that Buchanan is currently researching. The painted images in the Codex Benedictus, produced in south Italy in the eleventh century, will also be used as a comparative source in Buchanan’s current project.

Dr. Joshua Hill, assistant professor of history and a scholar of modern Chinese history, holds an interest in the creation and circulation of political ideas in China since the 19th century. (Courtesy of the College of Arts & Sciences website)

Dr. Joshua Hill, assistant professor of history and a scholar of modern Chinese history, holds an interest in the creation and circulation of political ideas in China since the 19th century. (Courtesy of the College of Arts & Sciences website)

Buchanan emphasized the significance of being able to use a facsimile, which includes pages that closely resemble the parchment of the original manuscript and paintings that look virtually like the original. The Lorsch Gospels also includes a faux-ivory reproduction of the original intricately designed book cover.

The Codex Benedictus is a manuscript facsimile of a collection of scripture readings that include illustrations detailing the life of St. Benedict.

“The Codex Benedictus adds to a group of south Italian eleventh-century manuscript facsimiles that are a focus of my teaching,” said Buchanan. “… Manuscripts from both periods are examined in graduate and undergraduate courses in early medieval manuscript illumination that I teach.”

Dr. Joshua Hill, assistant professor of history, was awarded the Arts and Humanities Junior Faculty Endowment for the Libraries’ purchase of Shen Bao newspaper, a Chinese-language historical newspaper published in Shanghai from 1872-1949. Shen Bao is a significant source of information regarding modern Chinese culture, history, literature and politics.

“Shen Bao was a major Shanghai daily newspaper—perhaps the best U.S. equivalent would be something like the New York Times,” said Hill. “The library has just purchased a full-text searchable database of this paper, which opens up endless possibilities for research into nearly any aspect of modern Chinese history.”

Please join Ohio University Libraries in congratulating Drs. Owens, Webster, Buchanan and Hill for being awarded with this year’s 1804 Special Library Endowment Fund and the Arts & Humanities Junior Faculty Endowment Fund Awards.

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Friends of Libraries Scholarships Awarded http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/05/friends-of-libraries-scholarships-awarded/ http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/05/friends-of-libraries-scholarships-awarded/#comments Tue, 26 May 2015 14:31:32 +0000 http://www.library.ohiou.edu/?p=30855
Xinyue Ren, the graduate recipient of the Friends of the Libraries Student Employee Scholarship, poses for a photograph in the Center for International Collections on the first floor of Alden Library on Wednesday, April 29, 2015. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

Xinyue Ren, the graduate recipient of the Friends of the Libraries Student Employee Scholarship, poses for a photograph in the Center for International Collections on the first floor of Alden Library on Wednesday, April 29, 2015. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

The Libraries’ student employees are among the small group who are most familiar with the collections, resources and operations of Ohio University Libraries.

Whether they are checking out materials for the Libraries’ users or assisting librarians with important day-to-day functions, the role of student employees is vital to the functionality of the Libraries.

Every year, the Friends of the Libraries, established in 1979, recognizes these efforts by awarding scholarships to the Libraries’ student employees. This year the Friends awarded two scholarships, each valued at $1,200, to graduate student Xinyue Ren, who worked in the Shao You-Bao Overseas Chinese Center on the first floor of Alden, and undergraduate student Haley Shaw who worked in the Music and Dance Library.

In order to be considered for the scholarships, student employees were encouraged to submit an essay on their experience using the Libraries’ resources for a research project, the value of Alden Library and how working at the Libraries has helped them personally. A committee then reviewed the students’ essays to select the scholarship recipients.

Haley Shaw, the undergraduate recipient of the Friends of the Libraries Student Employee Scholarship, poses for a photograph in the Music and Dance Library on Wednesday, April 29, 2015. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

Haley Shaw, the undergraduate recipient of the Friends of the Libraries Student Employee Scholarship, poses for a photograph in the Music and Dance Library on Wednesday, April 29, 2015. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

In Ren’s essay, she described the benefits of being able to access the Libraries’ resources for her research. In her scholarship essay she wrote:

“I chose Indian, Native American, and South American as my research subjects to compare different cultures behind the different performances of transvestism. In order to write a detailed and thorough paper, I had to do a large amount of research…After finishing my final paper, I thought that the library is like a big collector of information from all over the world, which made doing global research easier for students and faculty members.”

Shaw also used her essay to reflect on the critical role the Libraries played in conducting research for her honors thesis. In her essay, she wrote:

“From books and materials to electronic resources and physical space, I feel fortunate to have the Libraries as a vital part of my education. The use of library resources over the last four years have prepared me with the foundational understanding needed to embark upon one of the most significant research projects of my college career—my honors thesis on the subject of Ancient Greek gynecology. I am in the beginning stages of this project and have already utilized numerous resources the Libraries provide.”

The Libraries would like to congratulate Friends of the Libraries scholarship recipients, Xinyue Ren and Haley Shaw, for their hard work and dedication to the success of OHIO Libraries.

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Alden Library Exhibit Spotlights Athena Cinema http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/05/alden-library-exhibit-spotlights-athena-cinema/ http://www.library.ohiou.edu/2015/05/alden-library-exhibit-spotlights-athena-cinema/#comments Thu, 21 May 2015 16:38:57 +0000 http://www.library.ohiou.edu/?p=30803

When the lights dim in a movie theater, viewers often feel anticipation as they’re drawn into another world to watch a story unfold before their very eyes. The Athena Cinema has provided this experience for the students and residents of Athens for a century.

A script of the film “Northwest Mounted Police” signed by the cast, including Gary Cooper, photographed on Thursday, May 14, 2015 at Alden Library. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

A script of the film “Northwest Mounted Police” signed by the cast, including Gary Cooper, photographed on Thursday, May 14, 2015 at Alden Library. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

In celebration of the 100-year anniversary of the Athena Cinema, Ohio University Libraries will host a commemorative exhibit titled, “The Athena Cinema: From Silents to Sci Fi,” which will be on display from May 15 through June 30, 2015 on the fourth floor of Alden Library.

The exhibit will include photographs, articles, news clippings, posters and other memorabilia that will entice viewers to immerse themselves into the cinema’s rich history.

In addition, the fourth floor display will include a number of film magazines donated to the Libraries in November 2014, which date from the 1930s to the 1960s. These include publications such as: Cinema Arts magazine and The New York Dramatic Mirror magazine from the 1930s, Cinemafantastique magazine from the 1970s and other monographs on filmmaking.

According to Miriam Intrator, special collections librarian, the magazines, which include colorful visuals such as photographs and illustrations, “…provide a fantastic glimpse into mid-twentieth century American film history.”

Issues of Cinema Arts magazine from the early 1900s and an Ampro Precision movie projector photographed on Thursday, May 14, 2015. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

Issues of Cinema Arts magazine from the early 1900s and an Ampro Precision movie projector photographed on Thursday, May 14, 2015. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

“For students, the magazines provide a fun, interactive way to learn about actors and films that they may have never heard of because they are from so much before their time,” said Intrator. “Other featured actors, such as Gary Cooper or Greta Garbo, are virtually timeless.”

Lorraine Wochna, curator of the exhibit and subject librarian for the School of Film, among other areas, says the exhibit is a celebration of the collaboration between the Athena and the Libraries. The display will share the Libraries’ film collection, which consists of DVDs, screenplays and a film webpage, while showcasing the film-related items in special collections.

“…It is the art house in town,” said Wochna. “It’s held up for 100 years, and the Library has supported film not only by purchasing films from the eclectic array shown at [the] Athena, but from the Athens International Film and Video Festival, as well as other campus partnerships who have utilized the Athena films to educate.”

The Athena Cinema, which was opened in 1915, is considered to be one of the oldest movie theaters in the country. Over the years, the Athena has brought the stories shared through foreign, local and independent films, documentaries, and classic movies to the Athens community. In 2001, the University purchased the theater and began to restore it the following year.

The items in the exhibit were specifically selected because they aid in telling the story of the theater’s background: the history of the films screened and events hosted; the University’s adaptation of the cinema as a classroom space and as a venue for campus events.

This exhibit is the result of a partnership between Ohio University Libraries, the Athena Cinema, the School of Dance, Film and Theater, the Athens Historical Society and the Athens Center for Film and Video.

Please stop by the fourth floor of Alden Library to check out this captivating exhibit, which is available to view through June 30.

 

Featured Image:

A vintage projector on display as part of the exhibit on the fourth floor of Alden Library. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/Ohio University Libraries)

Thumbnail Image:

A photograph of a 1960 copy of Picturegoer, which is one of the publications from the Libraries collection of recently donated film magazines. (Photo by Tyler Stabile/ Ohio University Libraries)

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