Historic Student Newspaper Digitized

The Green and White, the University’s student newspaper from December 1911 to July 1939, was recently digitized and added to the Libraries’ online collections. The newspapers, such as this issue from October 1938, give researchers a student perspective on life at the University throughout history. (John Michael Simpson/Ohio University Libraries)
The Green and White, the University’s student newspaper from December 1911 to July 1939, was recently digitized and added to the Libraries’ online collections. The newspapers, such as this issue from October 1938, give researchers a student perspective on life at the University. (John Michael Simpson/Ohio University Libraries)

The Green and White, Ohio University’s student newspaper from December 1911 to July 1939, has been added to the Libraries’ online Ohio University Student Newspapers collection.

More than 1,000 issues of The Green and White are now available and can be found alongside issues of The Post (1999-2011), which were digitized in 2015.

Bill Kimok, university archivist and records manager, said student newspapers are valuable resources in learning about the unique history of Ohio University.

“Student newspapers such as The Post and The Green and White are written, edited, and published by the students themselves, most of whom are aspiring journalists,” he said. “So not only will e-readers and researchers of The Green and White be able to see the ever-important who, what, when, where, why, and how of events that happened at the University, they will see it through the eyes and perspectives of the students who experienced it and wrote about it at the time.”

Readers can click on individual stories on the pages to see the article separated from the rest of the newspaper. They can also search for specific topics or events, which they could not do when the newspaper was only available on microfilm.

“People using the newspaper to research University history from 1911 through 1938 had to rely on knowing approximate dates of events and people before they could review the paper with any hope of finding more information,” Kimok said. “The double blessing of having The Green and White digitized is that not only will researchers not need an index but also that rather than having to come to Athens to see it on microfilm, they will be able to pull it up online from anywhere in the world.”

Janet Carleton, digital initiatives coordinator, said reading about how global events shaped University history is particularly interesting.

Kimok said student newspapers also cover off-campus news, and seeing coverage written by students offers a unique perspective on historical events that other news sources may not offer.

“Our student newspapers throughout the years have reported on events that happened outside of the University—wars, politics, economic trends, world celebrations and tragedies, et cetera,” Kimok said. “The student newspaper offers us the chance to see Ohio University at the time and in the context of these world and national events, again through the perspectives of the student writers covering these stories.”

Having easy access to The Green and White also benefits researchers looking at how events on campus impacted each other.

“You can see things in context. What else was going on then?” Carleton said. “You have the whole newspaper, and the other issues of the newspaper around it, and you can see how things fit together.”

The student newspapers join the Libraries’ other digital collections, which include OHIO yearbooks, course catalogs and bulletins, alumni journals and the Ohio University Archives, among other collections—all which allow researchers to more easily find primary resources needed for their field of study.