Deadline Extended to Mar. 20 for Libraries’ 1804 and Junior Faculty Applications – OHIO University Libraries

Deadline Extended to Mar. 20 for Libraries’ 1804 and Junior Faculty Applications

Deadline is now extended to March 20

Students and faculty can both acquire resources needed for their research and help build the Libraries’ collections by applying for two funds that are currently seeking applicants. The 1804 Special Library Endowment Fund is open to students and faculty, and the Arts and Humanities Junior Faculty Fund is open to tenure track junior faculty.

The grants, which have application deadlines of March 20, provide recipients with the funds to purchase rare or highly specialized resources for their research and teaching. Past recipients have been awarded funding for manuscripts, newspaper archives, academic journals and backfiles, among other resources.

Carey Snyder, associate professor of English, was awarded the 1804 Special Library Endowment Fund for the “Women: Transnational Networks” module of the Nineteenth Century Collections database. She had previously traveled to London to read the suffrage periodical “Votes for Women,” but now she can access the magazine, including this issue from November 1909, online through the Libraries’ collections.
Carey Snyder, associate professor of English, was awarded the 1804 Special Library Endowment Fund for the “Women: Transnational Networks” module of the Nineteenth Century Collections database. She had previously traveled to London to read the suffrage periodical “Votes for Women,” but now she can access the magazine, including this issue from November 1909, online through the Libraries’ collections.

Both students and faculty are eligible to apply for the 1804 Library Endowment while tenure track faculty can apply for the Arts and Humanities Junior Faculty Fund.

“We know that there are faculty out there that are doing research for their tenure process, and the Libraries are looking to support that process,” said Janet Hulm, assistant dean for collections and digital initiatives.

The funds provide researchers with materials they may not be able to access otherwise by bringing resources to OHIO that are not found in the region and in some cases, are not available anywhere in the United States.

“Let’s say that there are original documents at a U.K. library needed for research for a publication. Instead of a faculty member traveling to get them, we can purchase copies on microfilm and have them cataloged and added to the Libraries’ collections so [researchers] don’t have to make that trip,” Hulm said. “Then in turn, those materials are made available to their students, their graduate students, and other researchers on into the future.”

Carey Snyder, an associate professor of English who received the 1804 grant last year, had previously traveled to London to look at the suffrage magazine “Votes for Women” for her research on the suffragist press. Because of the 1804 endowment, she can now access the “Women: Transnational Networks” module of the Nineteenth Century Collections online database without having to make an overseas trip.

“While I had enjoyed the thrill of paging through archival copies of this magazine in the British library the previous summer, what a digital database allows is a powerful tool for researchers like myself—the ability to do keyword or author-based searches within a magazine or across an archive of related print material,” she said.

Haley Duschinski, associate professor of anthropology and director of the Center for Law, Justice & Culture, received the 1804 grant last year to bring the Srinagar Law Journal to OHIO. The journal will aid Duschinski in her research on law and legal institutions in the conflict region of Indian-administered Kashmir. Duschinski said having resources like this law journal is not only useful for researchers at the University but will draw researchers to OHIO Libraries’ extensive collections.

“[This journal] will allow me to make significant progress on my current book project, and it will also offer opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to carry out their own projects on law and conflict in the region,” Duschinski said. “I anticipate that scholars from across the country will come to Ohio University to access this rare and valuable resource.”

Timothy Goheen, associate professor and director of the School of Visual Communication, received the 1804 grant for “The Power and the Glory,” a book featuring the work of famed photographer, Annie Leibovitz. Goheen said the book, which is 27 inches tall and has 476 pages, has been a valuable resource for visual communication courses, and students have enjoyed seeing Leibovitz’s work in a large format.

This facsimile of the “Book of Hours of Perugino,” a manuscript written in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, features full-page illuminations by artists such as Perugino, Lorenzo Costa and Francesco Francia. Marilyn Bradshaw, professor of art, was awarded the 1804 Special Library Endowment Fund for the manuscript, which is now available in the Libraries’ collections. (John Michael Simpson/Ohio University Libraries)
This facsimile of the “Book of Hours of Perugino,” a manuscript written in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, features full-page illuminations by artists such as Perugino, Lorenzo Costa and Francesco Francia. Marilyn Bradshaw, professor of art, was awarded the 1804 Special Library Endowment Fund for the manuscript, which is now available in the Libraries’ collections. (John Michael Simpson/Ohio University Libraries)

“I have already taken a class to see the book. We spent an entire class period looking through it. Several said they would come back on their own,” Goheen said. “All faculty should apply for the 1804 fund. In my opinion, there is no better way to enrich students and the University community than being able to bring these sorts of treasures to Athens.”

Marilyn Bradshaw, professor of art, is an Italian Renaissance scholar who received the 1804 fund for two manuscript facsimiles, the “Book of Hours of Perugino” and the “Codex Rustici.” She said having facsimiles of these manuscripts will allow her and her students to fully understand them in context.

“What is valuable about having these manuscript facsimiles is that students will be able to study the folios in relation to each other, going forward, backward, turning pages, and viewing them always as three-dimensional works,” Bradshaw said.

Damilola Daramola, assistant director for technical business development at the Center for Electrochemical Engineering Research, received the 1804 fund for “Graphene, 2D Materials and Carbon Nanotubes: Markets, Technologies and Opportunities 2016-2026,” a set of current and future reports detailing the science and technology of carbon and the market applications for carbon technology. He said the reports have been useful in marketing the research done at OHIO.

“I would suggest this grant for anyone who is looking at obtaining hard-to-find materials that are not available through the numerous channels that the University has,” Daramola said. “This is especially true if you are a researcher in science or engineering interested in understanding the market dynamics in your area of research.”

Assan Sarr, assistant professor of history, was awarded with both the 1804 and junior faculty funds for the “World Newspaper Archive African Newspapers Series 1 (1800-1922)” and the “British Online Archives African Blue Books, 1821-1953.”

“Thanks to this [1804] grant we now have an important and bigger primary source collection on Africa,” Sarr said. “This will help African history students, and I hope students in the journalism program, when writing research papers.”

Sarr said other faculty should apply for these grants to acquire the resources they need for their work and could not afford otherwise.

“Now I have the much needed resources that will help me in my teaching and research, and I want all other faculty who are in a similar situation to have this opportunity,” he said.

Nancy Story, library support specialist, displays photos of Michael Jordan that are included in Annie Leibovitz' SUMO-sized book, November 22, 2016. (John Michael Simpson/ Ohio University Libraries)
Nancy Story, library support specialist in arts and archives, displays photos of Michael Jordan from “The Power and the Glory,” a book featuring the photography of Annie Leibovitz. (John Michael Simpson/Ohio University Libraries)

Faculty can also apply for funding for multimedia resources. Deborah Henderson, professor and director of the School of Nursing, as well as the associate dean for regional higher education, received the 1804 fund for “Nurse Theorists: Portraits of Excellence Volumes 1, 2 and 3.” This collection includes interviews with nurses and nurse theorists who have made an impact in the field, and the School of Nursing has been able to use the collection to help build its resources on nursing in the Appalachian region.

Henderson said this collection is especially useful because it can be accessed anywhere.

“Any OHIO nurse student, anywhere, can have access to this comprehensive theory-focused media collection,” she said.

Faculty and students interested in applying for one of these grants can contact their subject librarian for help applying.

“[Faculty] should consider subject librarians as tools for getting through this application process to make it even more simple,” Hulm said. “Their subject librarian can work with me to get the quotes, to identify resources or to review the proposal.”

Hulm said the Libraries want to aid the OHIO community in their research, and these grants are one way that to do that.

“We want to award this money and expand our collections in ways we can’t otherwise,” she said. “In turn, grantees have this award for their resume or vita as well as have expanded access to interesting resources in the OHIO community.”